The A3 Press publishes chapbooks and The A3 Review, an international literary and art magazine. 

  • We hold monthly contests throughout the year for contributions to The A3 Review
  • The next reading period for chapbooks will open on 1st May 2020.

Please scroll down to enter The A3 Review's upcoming monthly contests. 

We welcome submissions from everywhere in the world.

Each month's two winning entries will appear in The A3 Review, a fold-out literary and art magazine published every six  months. The current issue is Issue 11 (The Squares Issue), which came out in October 2019.

Issue 12 (The "T" Issue): To be published in April 2020.

Issue 13 (The "H" Issue): The two winning entries from each month, March - August 2020,  will make up the list of contributors to Issue 13. From this list, three overall winning entries will be chosen in September 2020. These three ultimate winners will receive cash prizes: 1st = £250, 2nd = £150, 3rd = £75 (approx $325, $195, $95). 

Writing: Up to 150 words for prose and poetry (title not included). Poems no longer than 30 lines.

Art: Must fit into an A6 panel. That's about 4" x 6" or 10 x 15cm. Please send as low-res in the first instance. If your work is accepted, we'll ask for a hi-res image.

There is a fee of $5 (approx £3.50) per entry to help us cover admin and printing costs and to make sure we can keep offering cash prizes.

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These are The Rules for our monthly contests:

1. Entry fee is $5 (approx £3.50) per submission. Multiple entries are welcome, though each must be uploaded as a separate submission.

2. Enter online through Submittable. 

3. Each contest closes on the 4th Saturday of the month.

4. Any entries submitted after the deadline will not be eligible.

5. The A3 Review's Monthly Contest is open to all writers and artists over 16.

6. We encourage prose, poems, prose poems, graphic stories, hybrid forms, photography, illustration, painting.

7. Maximum number of words is 150. Poems must be no longer than 30 lines.

8. Artwork, graphic and comics stories must fit into an A6 panel.

9. Two winning entries from each month with appear in The A3 Review to be published every 6 months. From this shortlist of winners, 3 will be chosen to win cash prizes: 1st = £250, 2nd = £150, 3rd = £75 (approx: 1st = $325, 2nd: $195, 3rd: $95).

10. Entries must be available for The A3 Review, and must not have been previously published (including on blogs). 

11. Simultaneous submissions are accepted.

12. The judges' verdict is final. No correspondence will be entered into.

13. Judging is anonymous. 

14. Name and contact details must not appear on the entries.

15. Submission of entry is taken to be an unqualified acceptance of these rules.

Welcome to The A3 Review's April Contest

The prompt for this month's Contest is: Hospitals. What do you think about when you think about hospitals? 

A place to heal or a place of contagion, dangerous infections or near-magical recoveries? Write about an event from multiple points of view: the patient, the surgeon, and the part-time janitor. 

Write poems, short stories, and mini-essays, or create comics and illustrations inspired by hospital buildings, their public phones and car parks. Take inspiration from Philip Larkin’s meticulous “The Building” and write about the view from a hospital window. Consider the small things, too. The surgeon's tools, the items on a tray of food, those small acts of kindness. Write a praise song to nurses. Write about ways to pass the time in hospital and the memories those activities evoke. Like knitting, for example, as in Tom Leonard's “In Hospital."

Tell the story of being rushed to hospital or escaping from one. The first time you had stitches. An encounter in a waiting room. The second time you had stitches. Write about hospital food and hospital beds, sanitation and hygiene, humour and coldness. Take inspiration from Marianne Boruch’s “Hospital” and consider what it's like to watch hospital staff doing their work. 

Revisit some of those writers who were doctors, too. William Carlos Williams, Rafael Campo, and Gertrude Stein, who completed three years of medical school. Write about what it's like to be related to a doctor, to be the child of a surgeon, the brother of a surgeon, the lover of an anesthetist. Take inspiration from Aimee Nezhukumatathil's "Twelve Twelve Twelve."

Write about medication, as in Mathew Siegel's “My Pills Doze Until I Wake Them.” Or about plasters, bandages, crutches and casts. Write about the sounds of a hospital. Or of nursing homes, or a hospice or infirmary. Wounds, scars, and that third time you had to have stitches.

We welcome short stories, flash fiction, poetry, comics, graphic stories, a snippet of memoir, photographs, illustrations, and any combination of the above. The only restriction is a word-limit of 150 and images should fit well into an A6 postcard-sized panel.

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DEADLINE: 25 April 2020

Please make sure to view our full guidelines here.

Entry fee is $5 (approx £3) per submission. Multiple submissions welcome.

All genres welcome. All writers and artists welcome.

The two winning entries from each month's contest will be published in Issue #13 of The A3 Review in early October 2020. Winners will also receive contributor copies and Writing Maps.

CASH PRIZES: Three overall winners of the March till August contests will receive cash prizes: 1st = £250, 2nd = £150, 3rd = £75 (approx: 1st = $325, 2nd: $195, 3rd: $95).

Good luck and we look forward to seeing your work!

Brief Critiques. We offer feedback on submissions after the deadline date. If you'd like suggestions on ways to strengthen your work, just add the Brief Critique option to your submission fee, and we'll provide you with a line edit of your work, along with a 200-word critique.

Welcome to The A3 Review's May Contest

The prompt for this month's Contest is: Human. What does it mean to be human? To be a human being, a person, a mensch. Write about that time you dated a robot, but from the robot's point of view. Consider the relationship between humans and other creatures, as in Lydia Davis' very brief "Dog and Me." Or your relationship with more intangible entities: deities, mythical creatures, or characters in a book. 

Create a poem out of those abstract things that make us human: humility, hypocrisy, honesty, heartlessness (it's the H issue, after all) and imagination. Or kindness, as in Naomi Shihab Nye’s poem of that name. Write about a moment when you were confronted with your humanity (or your cruelty).

What's it like to be a human cannonball? A human experiment? Half-human? Challenge your imagination, slip into sci-fi and speculative fiction. Take inspiration from "The Robots Are Coming" by Kyle Dargan. Or consider the angel in Jill McDonough's “We’re Human Beings."

We're mere mortals in search of the divine, the libidinous and the lyrical in art and writing. Surprise yourself, then send it to us.

We welcome short stories, flash fiction, poetry, comics, graphic stories, a snippet of memoir, photographs, illustrations, and any combination of the above. The only restriction is a word-limit of 150 and images should fit well into an A6 postcard-sized panel.

Visit us on Twitter.

DEADLINE: 23 May 2020

Please make sure to view our full guidelines here.

Entry fee is $5 (approx £3) per submission. Multiple submissions welcome.

All genres welcome. All writers and artists welcome.

The two winning entries from each month's contest will be published in Issue #13 of The A3 Review in early October 2020. Winners will also receive contributor copies and Writing Maps.

CASH PRIZES: Three overall winners of the March till August contests will receive cash prizes: 1st = £250, 2nd = £150, 3rd = £75 (approx: 1st = $325, 2nd: $195, 3rd: $95).

Good luck and we look forward to seeing your work!

Brief Critiques. We offer feedback on submissions after the deadline date. If you'd like suggestions on ways to strengthen your work, just add the Brief Critique option to your submission fee, and we'll provide you with a line edit of your work, along with a 200-word critique.

The A3 Review offers a Brief Critique Service for writers looking for knowledgeable and forward-looking feedback on their work. We are passionate about writing and believe strongly that rewriting and refining a poem or short story is an essential and satisfying part of a writer's development. 

We will suggest ways to revisit and strengthen your short story or poem. Through our feedback, we aim to offer you tools to carry forward into other stories and poems you're working on.

Critiques are for prose and poetry up to 150 words.

An overview of what we offer:

  • 200-word feedback
  • a line edit of your work via Track Changes
  • suggestions for further reading (if relevant)

We look forward to being part of the ongoing development of your work.

About the Editor:

Shaun Levin, Editor, is the author of Seven Sweet Things, Trees at a Sanatorium, and the short story collections A Year of Two Summers and Snapshots of The Boy. His short stories and essays have been anthologised alongside writers such as Ali Smith, Nadine Gordimer and Edmund White. He has won an Arts Council Writers' Award and the Moment-Karma Short Fiction Prize, judged by Jonathan Safran Foer. Shaun is the founding editor of the literary magazine Chroma, and the creator of Writing Maps. Anthologies he has edited include Things that Have Happened and Writers in the Crowd.

What people say:

"Shaun's biggest gift to me was to teach me never to be satisfied with  the mediocre - to dig beneath my words until I found their core beauty  or anger or power; in other words to find the truth of what I was trying  to say." Rosie Rowell, author of Leopold Blue.

"I was impressed by the breadth and depth of the service, and would recommend it to anyone who is looking for the kind of feedback that is both challenging and supportive. A combination of written critique and detailed edit of my manuscript provided tremendous scope for my learning, and helped identify the most critical areas for focus." Dr Jacqui Scholes-Rhodes.

The A3 Review and Press